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Radiant Heat

 

Fire protective

glazing blocks smoke and flames, but not radiant heat.

 

Fire resistive glazing

blocks all three.

 

To learn more about the dangers of radiant heat transmission, click here.  

Fire Resistive Vs. Fire Protective Glass 
 

Issue 3 - June 2011

 

2012 IBC Clarifies Fire Rated Glass Applications

 

Greetings!

 

Welcome to "Code Considerations Quarterly," a publication by SAFTIFIRST designed to help architects and specifiers select the correct fire rated glazing (FRG) product based on the most current code and testing requirements.  

 

This issue reviews important revisions affecting FRG in the just-published 2012 IBC. For the first time, the IBC provides an easy-to-use guide advising where to use fire protective versus fire resistive glazing in door, window and wall assemblies. Revised Chapter 7 tables now clearly address size limits and appropriate FRG applications in interior and exterior walls and exit enclosures and passageways.  The new tables help professionals specify the correct glazing for FRG assemblies, and avoid the misuse of FRG products listed by testing agencies for end uses that the IBC prohibits. 

 

If you have a code question that you'd like to see answered in future issues, please email us

 
Thank you, 

The SAFTIFIRST Team

Carnegie Mellon


The 2012 IBC door assembly table emphasizes that sidelites and transoms in exit enclosures must be

fire resistive (see Carnegie Mellon example above.)

Pomona College

The 2012 IBC window rating table clarifies that FRG used in fire walls and fire barriers must be fire resistive (see Pomona College example above).

2012 IBC Door Assembly Rating Table 


The door assembly rating table (currently 715.4) in 2012 IBC adds new columns that provide additional end-use information and limitations, and illuminate important differences in the permitted uses of fire protective and fire resistive glazing.  One new column spells out size limits for vision panels which vary based on the application and whether or not the FRG is fire protective or fire resistive.  A second new column outlines the required fire rating and where fire resistive rather than fire protective glazing is required in sidelites and transoms. Click here to download the revised table.  Here are highlights:

 

  Fire protective (e.g., ceramics and wired glass) door vision panels in fire walls rated over one hour, one- and two-hour exit enclosures, exit passageways, and exterior 3- and 2-hour walls are limited to no more than 100 square inches.

 

  Fire protective glazing (e.g., ceramics and wired glass) in sidelites and transom assemblies are prohibited in fire walls, exterior and interior 3- and 2-hours walls, and exit enclosures and exit passageways.


2012 IBC Fire Window Rating Table 


In the 2012 IBC, the fire window assembly rating table (currently 715.5) is revised to clearly identify where fire resistive glazing (tested to ASTM E-119 or UL 263) must be used to block the transmission of radiant heat.

Click here to download the revised table.  Here are highlights:

 

  Fire protective glass (e.g., ceramics and wired glass) is prohibited in 1-hour fire barriers used as exit enclosures or passageways, even if they are listed for interior 60- and 90-minute windows.  Fire resistive products, on the other hand, are allowed. Fire protective products are allowed in fire barriers used as incidental use areas and mixed occupancies.

 

  Fire protective glass (e.g., specialty tempered, ceramics and wired glass) in fire window assemblies is limited to 45-minute applications, and then its total size may not exceed 25% of the wall area.  Larger glazing applications must be fire resistive glass tested to ASTM E-119.


iphone app

Confused about fire-rated glass?  Download mySAFTI app for information about various FRG products.

 

 

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Other Code Changes in 2012 IBC 


There are two other significant changes in the 2012 IBC related to FRG applications, marking and labeling.

 

Revised Label Marking Table  

The 2012 IBC revises the label marking table (currently 715.3) to require letter designations corresponding to test standard(s) to which the product was tested. Click here to download the revised labeling table.  

 

Fire Protective Door Vision Panels Limited in Size

The 2012 IBC removes an exception for fire protective door vision panels larger than 100 square inches in fully sprinklered buildings.  Why? Because sprinklers do not always work, and because it is important that building occupants be protected from the dangers of radiant heat when exiting a building in a fire. The new IBC emphasizes that large vision panels in exit enclosures and passageways must be fire resistive tested to the ASTM E-119 or UL 263. Click here to see some large vision panels using fire resistive glazing that meet both 2012 IBC and ADA requirements. 


Free AIA Webinar   


Train with a code expert who sat on the ICC's committee to revise the Chapter 7 tables in the 2012 IBC.  Earn an AIA continuing education credit while reviewing the 2012 IBC and learning ways to select the correct fire rated glass product.  Email us today to schedule your free webinar.